TECH

Damage to submarine cables affects internet worldwide


Damage to submarine cables in the Red Sea has caused problems with telecommunications networks. Because of this, suppliers need to redirect up to a quarter of the traffic between Asia, Europe and the Middle East – from here to the internet.

For those in a hurry:

  • Submarine cables in the Red Sea, essential to global telecommunications infrastructure, suffered damage, which affected data traffic between Asia, Europe and the Middle East, with providers rerouting around 25% of it;
  • These underwater cables, essential for global internet connectivity, receive investments from technology giants such as Meta, Google and Amazon;
  • Cable repairs face delays due to the need for special permits. Seacom, for example, reported that repair work will take at least a month to begin, indicating possible prolonged interruptions in internet service;
  • The incident comes after warnings about possible attacks by Houthi rebels on the cables. The group denied involvement and alleged action by British and American military units. The United Kingdom and the United States did not comment on the matter.

These underwater cables are a kind of invisible force behind cyberspace, as described in a CNN report. To give you an idea of ​​their importance, many are funded by American technology giants (for example: Meta, Google and Amazon).

Read more:

Problems with 'internet cables' in the Red Sea

Aerial view of the Red Sea
(Image: Blueee77/Shutterstock)

Hong Kong-based HGC Global Communications reported that 25% of traffic in these regions was impacted and has been working to reroute traffic and minimize outages.

The exact cause of damage to the cables and those responsible have not yet been specified by HGC. Seacom, owner of one of the affected systems, indicated that repairs will not begin for at least another month due to the time needed to obtain permissions to operate in the region.

Illustration of Brazil seen from space with internet lines over it
(Image: Pedro Spadoni via DALL-E/Olhar Digital)

These undersea cables are crucial to the global internet, with significant investment from major technology companies. Damage to these infrastructures could result in considerable disruption, as seen in previous events.

The incident comes after warnings about possible attacks by Houthi rebels on the cables. The group denied involvement and claimed it was the action of British and American military units. UK and US authorities have not commented on the allegations.

Among the affected cable systems are Asia-Africa-Europe 1 and Europe India Gateway, the latter having Vodafone (English operator) as one of the main investors. Vodafone has not commented on the incident.



Related Articles

Back to top button